medicine contraindications

Not All Calories Are Created Equal

One of the Biggest Diet Myths, perpetuated even by some of  the best known diet programs is:

“You can eat whatever you want, just watch your calories” This couldn’t be further from the truth, when in fact, eating a nutrient dense diet will not only accelerate your weight loss results, but it will also promote the healthy function of all the body’s systems.

You don’t have to starve, or eat unsavory food in order to be healthy and look great. You just have to make the right choices when you eat. The bottom line is: you can eat what you like, for as long as it is void of empty calories, and excess sugars. Here is an excellent article that explains more about this simple fact, enjoy…

Not All Calories Are Created Equal

By Ben T Coomber

Many people will lose weight, and quite often the focus of this weight loss is through counting all the calories that one eats. This is the basis of many successful weight loss programs, such as weight watchers, slimming world and even the governments eat well plate. But is such an approach warranted when not all calories can be counted as the same?

Don’t believe me? Let’s think logic, do you think that a calorie of sugar is going to have the same physiological impact on the body as a calorie of spinach, or steak? When we look at one calorie maybe not, but what if 500 of our daily calories are from, say, sugar? Do you think that such a huge proportion of someone’s daily calorie intake from something like sugar is not going to have a large negative effect seeing as sugar greatly elevates blood sugar level, insulin, stresses the appetite hormones and results in fat storage when not burnt as energy…

So when we count points on the weight watchers system, and a chocolate brownie is the same amount of points as a rare cooked steak, is it fair to say that such a system is highly flawed? Don’t get me wrong, keeping track of the calories that you are consuming can be of great benefit, but unless we are tracking the actual food sources these calories are coming from then we are only shortchanging the results that are possible.

Should anyone serious about losing weight really be allowed to eat a chocolate brownie? As soon as a system like this is implemented it gives the mentality that it is OK to eat anything in moderation, when really it isn’t, if you are serious about losing weight then there are definitely lots of food choices that should be totally absent from your diet. Anything that is sweet and cake related is a definite no no, cause although we are looking to lose weight it is likely you are looking to become healthier as well, and none of these things are going to make you healthier, yet increase your risk of disease development. Remember that the healthier you are the quicker and more efficiently you will lose weight, it’s a positive catch 22 that you want to be in.

I almost hold my hands over my ears with fear when I question why someone might have eaten some cake or something equally bad, the response usually goes like this “oh don’t worry, it was a weight watchers cake”. If weight watchers had developed a way to make CAKE healthy I think they would have won the noble peace prize, everyone would be eating it. Cake, whatever way you slice it is bad. It’s full of sugar, hydrogenated fat, refined flour and preservatives, so just cause it was a weight watchers cake does not mean it was any healthier than a normal cake. Yes it might have a few less calories, but does it really matter, what matter is that the ingredients were pure junk. Compare all those calories to a whole dairy yogurt and a chopped banana and we are talking about a whole different ball game.

So by all means count calories, but cake calories don’t count!

Ben Coomber consults with MMA, rowing, rugby and physique athletes at various levels. Consults for UK tennis, and owns and runs Body Type Nutrition. He is an Internationally Certified Sports Nutritionist.

Sports nutrition consultations: http://www.bodytypenutrition.co.uk

Author website: http://www.bencoomber.com

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All Weight Loss Diets Fail

“Lose 30 pounds in 30 days, guaranteed” says the man in the radio commercial for the weight loss clinic, or “1 Tip To Fast Weight Loss” reads the marketing ad.

 

Quick weight loss promises like these are common everywhere you go. And yet in the United States of America 2 out of every 3 people are overweight or obese. With obesity being the number one contributor to killer diseases like Diabetes, and Heart Disease, it is obvious that we have a problem of epidemic proportions.

 

It is ironic that in our modern world of sophisticated technical advances, and instant communications, the answer to better health eludes us. Every body is looking for the magic formula for weight management and weight control. But what dominate the information super highway are dietary gimmicks that pin your willpower against your ever-slowing metabolism. The end result: the same old yo-yo diet.

 

In my Acupuncture practice, I help people lose weight with acupuncture and dietary advice. I have noticed that everybody that comes for weight loss treatments have something in common; they all have a favorite diet, you name it: the Adkins Diet, the South Beach Diet, the Zone diet, Weight Watchers, etc, etc. Any diet that they followed in the past, that gave them some success at losing weight, is considered a good diet. And yet, they now sit in my office wanting to lose the weight again, this time with the help of acupuncture.

 

Faced with this fact, two questions come to mind. If your diet was successful, how come you ended up regaining the weight again? And why not just do the same thing again, and shed the excess weight like the first time?

 

The answer lies on the initial goal of the weight loss diet. One, and perhaps the most popular definition of the word diet, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is: a regimen of eating and drinking sparingly so as to reduce one’s weight. If you ask the average person what comes to mind when they hear the word diet you’ll probably get answers like: restrictive meal plan, or planned starvation or something that denotes unpleasantness.

 

If the goal of the diet is weight loss, once you achieve the desired weight you’ll stop dieting because you reached your goal. But absent the diet, you will revert to the habits that made you gain the weight to begin with.

 

In 2009 Researchers at Laval University in Québec, Canada did a study in which the emphasis was put on health improvement rather than in actual weight loss. The participants in the study were overweight or obese women who had likely entered the study as chronic dieters. They were taught good nutrition (what TO eat, not what NOT to eat); they were helped to enjoy physical activity, and how to listen to their bodies. It also taught strategies for appreciating their body as it is now, regardless of size.

 

At the 1-year follow-up, two-thirds of participants had lost weight, despite the interventions’ explicit focus on positive behaviors, not trying to reduce food intake or lose weight. When you compare these results with the results of a typical diet, it proved to be an outstanding success.

 

What you get when you pin willpower against biology, is that biology wins every time.

A better choice is to follow a wellness and nutrition program that, helps you learn how to eat healthy, aids you to speed up your metabolism and focused on your over all health. And a nice side effect of having the knowledge on how to maintain a healthy body is the faster road to achieving the elusive body of our dreams.

 

>>Read more about a wellness program that has worked well for myself, and my patients at http://my365fitness.com/fitnessandnutrition <<

 

 

1. Provencher V, Bégin C, Tremblay A, et al. (2009). Health-at-every-size and eating behaviors: 1-year follow-up results of a size acceptance intervention. J Am Diet Assoc, 109(11),1854-1861.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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